Dealing with Rejection

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One of the things I discovered since I started this business is rejection is an essential part of the journey. It’s not just about mastering how to not take no for an answer, its also about knowing how to take no for an answer when move on to the next thing.

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Being rejected sucks. I’ve experienced it plenty of times when asking for work opportunities. It’s hard not to take it personally and not doubt the quality of your work. But while it’s important to keep a regular check on your work, it’s also equally important to remind yourself that you can’t please everybody, i.e. your work is not going to be to everybody’s taste (especially if you’re doing something creative!). Sometimes rejection can even save you from working with someone you probably would not get along with. Or it can even lead you to better things, as cliche as it sounds. And I hate cliches.

But there’s another aspect to it. Rejection filters out who’s really keen from who isn’t. It doesn’t hurt to come back to them and show your persistence and flexibility because really, you have nothing to lose. If they find it annoying then I guess they find it annoying! But since most interactions (i.e the initial stages of job opportunities) these days are done online anyway, you’re probably not going to have to ever see them in real life (or if you have, you won’t have to see them every again!). But seriously, the worst thing that can happen is probably not even that bad. So if you can just conquer that fear and take an action, you’ll find that (1) you’re a lot braver than you thought you were; and (2) you might give yourself new opportunities you didn’t think possible.

I hope you find this helpful!

Jess x